Da Nang Airport Vietnam

The Da Nang International Airport is the third busiest airport in Vietnam. It is an important transport hub in the central region. The airport is located 2 km from the city center.

The new terminal building opened at the end of 2011 offering travelers modern facilities and a wide range of airport services, including many shopping and dining venues.
Vietnam Airlines operates a number of daily flights to Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Nha Trang and other destinations in Vietnam. International flights to Da Nang airport operate from Singapore, Seoul, South Korea and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Advertisements

By land
The Hai Van Pass.
See also: Hai Van Pass and Hai Van Tunnel

Đà Nẵng is a major station along the North-South Railway, also known as the Reunification Express. National Highways 1A and 14B run through the city, providing road connections to Hanoi in the north and Hồ Chí Minh City in the south, as well as the Central Highlands and Laos to the west. The Hải Vân Pass is a mountain pass separating Đà Nẵng and Thừa Thiên-Huế Province, where Highway 1A road passes through. To cut down on transit time and the danger to motorists from navigating the twisting mountain road, the Hải Vân Tunnel was built, opening in 2005. It is the longest tunnel in Southeast Asia at 6.28 km, and allows motorists to save between 30 minutes and an hour on traveling times over the old Hải Vân Pass route. An expressway between Đà Nẵng and nearby Quang Ngai is also in the planning stages.

Several bridges cross the Han River and its tributaries in Đà Nẵng, including the iconic Han River Bridge, Tran Thi Ly Bridge, Nguyễn Văn Trỗi Bridge, Tuyen Son Bridge and the recently completed Thuan Phuoc Bridge, which is the longest suspension bridge in Vietnam.The Dragon River Bridge will cross the Han River at the Le Dinh Duong/Bach Dang roundabout, offering tourists coming from Đà Nẵng International Airport a more direct route to Mỹ Khế and Non Nuoc beaches, along the city’s eastern edge.
By sea
The Legend of the Seas calls at Da Nang Port in February 2009.
Main article: Da Nang Port

 Đà Nẵng’s port system is the third largest in Vietnam after Hồ Chí Minh City and Hải Phòng. In 2008, Đà Nẵng’s port handled 2.7 million tons of cargo, of which 1.2 million tons were exports, 525,900 tons were imports, and 985,600 tons were domestic cargo. Over 29,600 passengers passed through the port in 2008, a significant increase over previous years. The port system consists of two areas: Tiên Sa Seaport, and Song Hàn Terminal. Tiên Sa Seaport has a navigation depth of 11m, and is able to receive medium range tankers of up to 45,000 DWT, as well as container ships and large cruise ships. The approach to Song Hàn Terminal is 12 nautical miles (22 km) long with a navigation depth of 6-7m, and can accommodate vessels of up to 5,000 DWT. Vietnam National Shipping Lines (Vinalines) is the port authority for Đà Nẵng’s port system.
Despite the fact that the port’s infrastructure is not specifically designed to accommodate cruise ships, the number of large cruise ships docking at Đà Nẵng Port has increased in recent years.In the first two months of 2010 alone, 12 cruise ships docked in Đà Nẵng, carrying 6,477 passengers.

Transportation

Đà Nẵng is on the end of the East-West Economic Corridor (EWEC) which stretches over Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and Burma (Myanmar).
By air
Main article: Da Nang International Airport

Đà Nẵng International Airport, located at the center of the city, is the third largest international airport in Vietnam. It is an important gateway to access central Vietnam. The airport was known as Đà Nẵng Air Base during the Vietnam War, during which time it was described as the world’s busiest airport.[18] During the month of May 1968, the base reached an average of 2,595 air traffic operations daily, more than any airport in the world.[19] As of June 2011, the airport has domestic connections to Hanoi, Hồ Chí Minh City, Hải Phòng, Buon Ma Thuot, Đà Lạt, Nha Trang, and Pleiku, as well as international connections to Guangzhou (People’s Republic of China), Siem Reap (Cambodia), Singapore, and Taipei (Taiwan).

Beginning 16 December 2011, a Malaysian low-cost carrier began offering four flights a week between Đà Nẵng and Kuala Lumpur. A new international terminal opened in December 2011[52] and which is expected to allow further connections to destinations such as Phnom Penh (Cambodia), Thailand, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea.

Sports

Ðà Nẵng’s football club, SHB Ðà Nẵng F.C., plays in the V-League, Vietnam’s top professional football league. They are currently one of the most highly ranked teams in that league, having emerged from competition as champions of the 2009 V-League.

In the same year, they were also champions at the Vietnamese Cup playoffs. They also qualified for the 2010 AFC Champions League and the 2010 AFC Cup; although they did not advance past the qualifying play-off in the Champions League,they advanced to the quarter-finals of the AFC Cup after defeating Becamex Bình Dương in extra time. Several Ðà Nẵng F.C. players also play on Vietnam’s national football team, including defender Võ Hoàng Quảng and midfielder Phan Thanh Hưng. SHB Ðà Nẵng F.C. plays its home games at the Chi Lang Stadium, a 30,000-seat stadium in Hải Châu District.

Tourism
See also: Hội An and Mỹ Sơn
Gateway leading to Huyen Khong Cave in the Marble Mountains.
Cable car in Bà Nà Mountains

The tourism sector is a vital component of Da Nang‘s economy. Its status as a transportation hub for Central Vietnam and its proximity to several UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including the Imperial City of Huế, the Old Town of Hội An, and the Mỹ Sơn ruins fuels much of its tourist activity.

Mỹ Sơn is an archaeological site dating back more than a thousand years, in Quảng Nam. Located in a remote forested valley some 70 km west of Đà Nẵng, this former capital and religious center of the Champa kingdom once contained in excess of 70 style temples and stupas. Although badly damaged by bombing raids in the 1960s, the site still has more than 20 structures and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999. Many statues, sculptures and reliefs recovered from Mỹ Sơn are kept in the Museum of Cham Sculpture, near the Hàn River in the heart of Đà Nẵng. Dating from the fourth to the 14th centuries, the sensual artwork on these works depicts daily activities as well as Hindu and Buddhist religious themes.

 The Marble Mountains are rocky limestone outcrops jutting out of the beach just south of Đà Nẵng. Paths lead to the top of the forested cliffs, affording spectacular views of Non Nuoc Beach and the South China Sea. The caves nestled in the cliffs were originally inhabited by the Cham people. Later, the Nguyễn Dynasty built numerous pagodas among the caves. The Marble Mountains are home to various artisans producing sculpture and artwork at its base. Non Nuoc Beach is a white sandy beach on the outskirts of Đà Nẵng is renowned for both its spectacular beauty and for its history as an R&R destination for American troops during the Vietnam War, when it was known as “China Beach”.[45][46][47][48] Today, the beach, along with My Khê beach to the north, are home to expensive resorts, surfing and entertainment facilities. Bà Nà Hills is a mountain resort with a 5 km-long cable car system which carries guests up to Bà Nà’s peak at 1487m above sea level. Sơn Trà Mountain, just some miles away from downtown with some wild streams and resorts along the seaside.

Natural disasters

Widespread flooding in Đà Nẵng in the wake of Typhoon Ketsana.

Đà Nẵng is susceptible to damage from typhoons that cross into the South China Sea. In 2006, the landfall of Typhoon Xangsane near the city of Huế caused 26 deaths in Đà Nẵng, damaging and destroying homes, downing trees and power lines and flooding major streets.

Authorities in Đà Nẵng estimated the damage caused by Xangsane at around US$ 200 million, with more than 5,000 houses washed away, 166,000 homes damaged and 19 boats sunk. Three years later, Typhoon Ketsana made its landfall about 37 miles (60 km) south of Đà Nẵng, again causing widespread flooding. Ketsana left eight people dead and 96 injured in Đà Nẵng, and caused an estimated billion in damage.

Shortly after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, which triggered a powerful tsunami, the People’s Committee of Đà Nẵng approved the installation of 10 early tsunami warning stations throughout the city, the first of their kind in Vietnam. Officials expected the stations would provide at least thirty minutes of warning in case of a tsunami. According to Le Huy Minh, Director of the Earthquake and Tsunami Warning Centre at the Vietnam Institute of Geophysics, a powerful earthquake (≥8 MW) in the waters north of the Philippines could pose a significant danger to the Vietnamese coastline, particularly the area around Đà Nẵng.

Climate

Đà Nẵng has a tropical monsoon climate with two seasons: a typhoon & wet season lasting from September through March and a dry season lasting from April through August. Temperatures are typically high, with an annual average of 25.9 °C (78.6 °F). Temperatures are highest between June and August (averaging 33 to 34 °C (91 to 93 °F)), and lowest between December and February (averaging 18 to 19 °C (64 to 66 °F)). Cold, wet and windy in winter, bringing even lower temperatures in December and January. The annual average for humidity is 80.6%, with highs between October and December (reaching 84%) and lows between June and July (reaching 74–75%)

 On average, Đà Nẵng receives 2,505 mm (98.6 in) of rainfall. Rainfall is typically highest between October and November (ranging from 550 to 1,000 mm (22 to 39 in)) and lowest between January and April (ranging from 23 to 40 mm (0.91 to 1.6 in)). Đà Nẵng receives an average of 2156 hours of sunlight annually, with highs between 234 and 277 hours per month in May and June and lows between 69 and 165 hours per month in November and December.